Showing posts with label picture books. Show all posts
Showing posts with label picture books. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

The Great Big Treasury of Beatrix Potter

Anyone else out there remember Beatrix Potter? Or am I showing my age?

This great book contains the complete works of Beatrix Potter, 19 of her very own fairy tales with her delightfully intricate illustrations.
I was familiar with Peter Rabbit, but totally unaware of all of the bunnies, mice, kittens, puppies, pigs, ducks, chipmunks, and squirrel characters in jackets and bonnets.

They learn wisdom from natural consequences like--"If you go into Mr. McGregor's garden, Mrs. McGregor may turn you into pie." Or, "If you're not patient and faithfully sit on your eggs, you're liable to lose them to the dogs," like Jemima Puddle Duck. Don't you totally love that name?

I envy authors who can illustrate their own stories. Beatrix and her brother Bertram, grew up lonely in a very wealthy family. They snuck woodland creatures into the house to study and draw them.
Beatrix Potter was born in London, 1866, and later raised on an estate in Scotland. A lot of her stories were written as gifts to family and friends.

Return to the woodland and share these classic stories from a simpler era, with your kids and grandkids.



Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Review of Papa's Book of Mormon Christmas by Emma Rae Parker



Set in the early 1900s, the story follows a six-year-old named Alice who is spending the Christmas holiday with her grandfather. As they play in the snow and decorate cookies,
Alice cannot think about much else besides the toys Santa will be bringing her that night.
When Papa shares with her the story of his Christmas during the Civil War
where he was separated from his family and only had a new friend named Nephi for company,
Alice realizes that she might want to meet Nephi this Christmas too.
Papa's Book of Mormon Christmas
by Emma Rae Parker
illustrated by Alexa Terry Hanson
This is a tender little picture book that reminds all of us that there is more to Christmas
than all of the trappings and delights. Finding friends in the Book of Mormon really brings it to life. Kids want to know that the characters and the stories are real.
The illustrations are sweet and help portray the message.


Thursday, October 22, 2015

2 Cute Halloween Picture Books

Here are a couple of fun Halloween picture books for the wee ones.
Splat the Cat: What Was That?

Splat the Cat and his friend Spike have to rescue
a friend who went in the haunted house.
There is a surprise flap to lift on every page.
It is spooky good fun and the illustrations
are cute and quirky which makes for more fun.


Room on the Broom
by Julia Donaldson


Is there room on the broom for one more friend?
Always. And good thing too!
These friends prove to be great friends.
This is a cute story that teaches a sweet lesson about friendship.
The pictures are adorable.



Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Grandkids 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 Favorites

This post contains affiliate links

Grandkids 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 
Walter the Farting Dog
by William Kotzwinkle and Glenn Murray
illustrated by Audrey Colman



Warning: This book may cause flatulence. Walter is a fine dog, except for one small problem: he has gas. He can't help it; it's just the way he is. Fortunately, the kids Billy and Betty love him regardless, but Father says he's got to go! Poor Walter, he's going to the dog pound tomorrow. And then, in the night, burglars strike. Walter has his chance to be a hero.
Banned from the Beach

Mr. and Mrs. Crabbe are enjoying their seaside vacation . . . until a certain dog blows away their umbrella with an enormous fart. Before long, Walter is banned from the beach. While Walter is stuck in the beach house, Betty and Billy hunt for treasure out on a sandbar. As soon as they find a nickel, Mr. and Mrs. Crabbe elbow their way in. Soon all four get marooned during high tide. Will Walter hear their cries for help?

Trouble at the Yard Sale


Walter's family is holding a yard sale, but there are few customers. Walter, fartingcontentedly near Father, wonders why. When a man offers ten dollars for Walter, Father readily agrees. Walter wonders why. Walter is sad to leave his family behind, but relieved to discover that his new owner is a clown. Walter figures he will help the clown bring joy to children on their birthdays. But the clown has a dastardly plot: he will use Walter's gas to inflate balloons and then pop them to stun guards during bank robberies. Will Walter turn to the dark side? Of course not! He comes out a hero and is reunited with his family by doing what he does best.

Goes on a Cruise



Walter the Farting Dog is now a hero of the high seas!
Everybody is having a great time on a cruise . . . until a terrible odor permeates the ship. All signs point to Walter, and so he is first banished down below, with the stinky cheeses, and then into a lifeboat to float behind the ocean liner. Then catastrophe strikes! How long will the great cruise ship and its frightened passengers be marooned on the high seas? About as long as it takes Walter to digest that cheese!

Rough Weather Ahead


Book #3 takes the beloved mutt to new heights!
Professor Kompressor's anti-gas formula causes Walter to blow up like a balloon and float away. Just when it looks as though Walter's paws may never touch ground again, he encounters a flock of butterflies in distress. Only Walter's warm wind can save them from an icy death.


I read the first of this series--potty humor at its best. The first book is hilarious and the
illustrations are totally quirky adding to the humor. It caught me off guard. 




Friday, August 7, 2015

It is Perfect to be Just Who You Are by Veronica Ortiz

It Is Perfect to be Just Who You Are!
by Veronica Ortiz

If you'd like to teach your children what kindness means
then this set is for you.
The author defines and gives examples
of different ways to show kindness.


Acceptance, Tolerance, Gratitude--
help your children understand what they mean
and how to practice these traits.

It Is Perfect to be Kind to Animals
by Veronica Ortiz

This is a companion, activity book that
teaches kindness to animals.



Explains what it means to be gentle, helpful,
forgiving, and caring with examples,
with space to draw examples of how the
children can show forgiveness, etc,
helping them apply these principles in their present lives.

This set also comes with a memory type card game.


Learning kindness can be fun.

Contact the author on her

to get your set!





Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Review of The Beetle and the Berry by Eve Heidi Bine-Stock

One day, tiny Arthur the Beetle finds a large, juicy berry, big enough to feed him for a week. Excited by his discovery, he begins pushing it home, planning how much he is going to like eating the berry. Then suddenly, his berry gets stuck, and Arthur the Beetle has to figure out how to free it. Sometimes approaching a problem straight ahead just will not work. There are times when a problem can only be resolved by backing off, and approaching it from a new direction. This is a difficult life lesson for most children to learn, but "The Beetle and the Berry" makes this concept easy for children to understand. Appropriate for ages 3-6. (Cindy Penn contributed to this description.)

Children will root for the tiny beetle, and, without knowing it, will be learning problem-solving and critical thinking skills. This story is based on a true event witnessed in nature.
The Beetle and the Berry
by Eve Heidi Bine-Stock


What I liked about this book:

The illustrations are simple, bright, and colorful.
It is short enough for younger children's short attention spans. Also short enough on those nights when you're stretched for time but love to read bed-time stories to your wee ones.
The words are simple enough and big enough that an older child (ages 8-10) could read it to a sibling (ages 3-6).

It demonstrates problem solving skills. What a great alternative to anger and frustration.
I give it




Thursday, June 18, 2015

FREEBIE FRIDAY! Review of Picture of Grace by Josh Armstrong Illustrated by Taylor Bills

"When I grow up, I want to be just like you," said Grace

"That's very kind of you," said Grandpa Walt, "but I can think of nothing better than you simply being yourself."
Six-year-old Grace aspires to be an artist like her beloved grandfather Walt. Every week, she goes to his house and watches with great joy as he paints.

Of course, not everyone appreciates Grandpa Walt's artwork. But as Walt tells Grace, "Some people appreciate the hard work while others just want the painting to be finished. But you can't be distracted by either group."

When tragedy strikes, Grace takes it upon herself to honor Grandpa Walt in a special way. Through her act of love and kindness, Grace's family discovers an amazing secret about Walt's final, unfinished masterpiece.

Picture of Grace
by Josh Armstrong
Illustrated by Taylor Bills



My thoughts:

This is a sweet, and thought provoking story. The other reviews on Amazon are more about the comfort the story gave related to the loss of a loved one. I believe this story goes deeper.

So many times, we overlook the contributions of our children. We take it at face value, or as something that needs to be cleaned up without finding out why they colored on the wall or picked every flower in the garden. As a young, impatient mom I saw the annoying and the frustrating things more often than not. I blame it on a lack of sleep. I can appreciate their worth so much easier now that I am a grandmother. I can see what was meant to be a gift in what I once saw as frustrating.

It reminds me of a movie (that I can't remember the title of) about a tired, frustrated mom whose little girl drew crayon pictures on the wall. Her initial reaction was the frustrated one. Later, instead of washing the wall, she finds a couple of empty frames to put over the wall art. That taught her daughter that she and her artwork were valued.

You'll enjoy the ending. I think that Delilah Kain's mommy was the kind of mom who made Delilah scrub the walls when she colored on them.

The illustrations are adorable and full of details.

I give it ****


Did I mention it is FREE!!!
Only this weekend. Don't miss out!
  


Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Book Recommendations from Granddaughter 1.4




Granddaughter 1.4



This granddaughter loves books about fairies, princesses, and fairy princesses. Anything related to Frozen  has been at the top of her list for the last two years.
These are her book recommendations:

1.3 loves any fairy stories related to Tinker Bell.



We can't forget Frozen-- Frozen books, dolls, songs--the whole she-bang!



She also Loves Little Critter and his whole family!
I love that she learns from these books.


She really enjoys all of the Berenstain Bears books, but this story is a special favorite.


During the summer, her family goes to the Library every two weeks. I love that my grandkids have developed a love of reading. It comes from both parents.


Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Review of Moon Mail and Star Kisses by Amanda Salisbury

Book Blurb:
A loving adult and child must be separated for a little while. The adult promises to send greetings and kisses through the night sky, shared no matter the distance of place or time apart. The moon, the stars, and a person's love are bright and constant even when they cannot be seen.
Moon Mail and Star Kisses
by Amanda Salisbury


I loved this sweet little book. What a lovely way to ease a child's fears when a parent must be away. It comforts adults just the same. This book could be used in so many personal situations, even if it's just saying goodnight and sleeping in another room, going to daycare, or having grandparents who live far away. It could even be used to let children know that loved ones who pass away will always love them.

I loved the book cover--how inventive is that?





Moon Mall



Moon Mail and Star Kisses  Moon Mail and Star Kisses by Amanda Salisbury In Moon Mail and Star Kisses, a loving adult and child must be separated for a little while. The adult promises the child to send greetings and kisses through the night sky, shared no matter the distance of place or time apart. The moon, the stars, and a person’s love are bright and constant even when they cannot be seen.
add to goodreads
  Copy of IMG_0500Author Amanda Salisbury Amanda Salisbury lives on the red planet of Oklahoma. All her best stories are sifted through the screens of her education and experience in history, law, finance, and mothering. She lives with her husband and boys in a lair, a classroom, or a castle, depending on the moment.
25_Amazon_Paypal Blog Tour Giveaway $25 Amazon Gift Card or Paypal Cash Ends 6/2/15 Open only to those who can legally enter, receive and use an Amazon.com Gift Code or Paypal Cash. Winning Entry will be verified prior to prize being awarded. No purchase necessary. You must be 18 or older to enter or have your parent enter for you. The winner will be chosen by rafflecopter and announced here as well as emailed and will have 48 hours to respond or a new winner will be chosen. This giveaway is in no way associated with Facebook, Twitter, Rafflecopter or any other entity unless otherwise specified. The number of eligible entries received determines the odds of winning. Giveaway was organized by Kathy from I Am A Reader and sponsored by the author. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. a Rafflecopter giveaway

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Amy's Review of Too Safe for Strangers and Too Smart for Bullies by Deputy Sheriff Robert Kahn and Sharon Chandler


Too Safe for Strangers, Too Smart for Bullies
by Deputy Sheriff Robert Kahn and Sharon Chandler
illustrated by Sue Lynn Cotton

Genre:  Children's Safety - Nonfiction
Content: Clean
Publisher: Future Horizons
Release date:  October 2001
Number of Pages: 24




Book Blurb:


 
Most children, especially children on the autism spectrum, accept adults' friendliness at face value. Sometimes it can have tragic consequences. Written by a Deputy Sheriff, this book is credited with foiling at least 22 stranger abductions. Characters Bobby and Mandee explain stranger danger in a way that is accessible, but not frightening, for children. Read it to your child and role-play different scenarios. Create a password only you and your child know, label backpacks on the inside (so strangers won't know your name). Strangers can be men or women, old or young. Adults should not touch, give gifts to, or ask for help from children. If they do, don't keep it a secret! Tell an adult! Arm your child with the knowledge that may save his or her life.





Book Blurb:

Bullies, Beware! This is a little book is going to have a big impact! In this moral-driven story, Mandee tells big brother Bobby how a bully took all her money. Bobby stresses that she needs adult help, and explains what to do if it happens again. Don't argue; just walk or run away; tell a trusted adult, or call 911. If the adult doesn't believe you, tell another adult until you find someone who understands. A quiz at the back of the book helps the reader remember what to do, and there's a place to write the phone numbers of ""safe grown-ups"" to call.
Amy's Opinion:
I read these books to my kids and it opened up some questions and good discussions.  It covered a lot of good information and helped kids to understand the difference between being impolite and being safe.  They are taught to respect adults, but not all adults are safe and the book points that out.  I do think the book is a little outdated in that it didn't discuss anything about not talking to strangers online.  Especially in reference to the "Too Smart for Bullies" book, they only talked about physical bullies.  They didn't discuss emotional bullies or cyber bullies.  Kids today face bullying in a whole new way - mostly through email, text and social media.  I think it is necessary to include that in these books as well, or perhaps make another book all about computer and technology safety. 
Rating: ****
Another book by this author
Good Touch Bad Touch
by Robert Kahn
Illustrated by Chris Hardie


Book Blurb:
Educate, before it’s too late!
In this simple and engaging guide, Mandee and Bobby explain "good touches" (hugs and kisses from family members, a pat on the back, a handshake, or a high 5) and "bad touches" (a hit, slap, punch, kick, bite, hard pinch, shove, or grabbing, tugging, scratching, tripping, or choking). They describe how to recognize each kind of touch, the differences between them, and how to respond.
Then Bobby and Mandee talk about private areas and what to do if someone touches you in those places (“Tell a trusted adult! It isn’t your fault!”). They explain that it’s not okay to keep a secret about private areas, even if the person who touched you says that bad things might happen if you tell.
When it comes to bad touches, Bobby triumphantly concludes, “Whether it is a stranger, or someone you know well, the rules to be safe are always the same: Say no! Run Away! And find a grown up friend to tell!”
Author and former Deputy Sheriff Robert Kahn recommends that parents read this book with their children and encourage teachers to share it with the class!
Helpful features include:
  • Bobby and Mandee’s Touch Test – an 8-question quiz along with page numbers for each answer
  • 911 Tips for Parents – a guide for teaching kids when and how to dial 911
  • My List of Safe Grown-ups to Call – a blank form that parents and children can fill out together

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

The Children's Choice Book Awards 2014 Grades 3-4

This award isn't like the Caldecott or Newbery awards. Children, parents, and teachers get to vote for their favorites. It's the Children's Choice Book Awards for 2014.

The Stubby Pencil Reviews
 the 2014 winners for grades 3-4
We used the Public Library for these reviews but I ended up buying some of them. We were not compensated in any way for these reviews.
Bugs in My Hair!
by David Shannon


Book Blurb:
Is something bugging you? Bestselling award-winner David Shannon shows the funny side of waging war against--oh no!--head lice.

This book is guaranteed to make you laugh--and itch! From the opening picture of a happy, oversized louse appearing with his suitcases, you know these bugs are determined to stay, and Mom is about to go nuts!

Nobody talks about them, but they are everywhere. (Some estimate 20 million children a year host them.) Oh the shame and humiliation of having bugs in your hair! But if you go to school, or have play dates, chances are good you might meet them someday. Maybe you already have! Lucky for you, the unwelcome bugs in this story are so funny you will be laughing aloud--even when Mom attacks them with battle-tested anti-lice weapons.

Shannon peppers his hilarious scenes with fun, "nitpicking" facts about these "lousy" critters and pokes fun at common denial: "It's probably ash from that volcano in Pogo Pogo."

Soon the party's over--Bye bye, Little Nasties! Once again Shannon has created a fresh, highly entertaining read-aloud classic that begs to be read again and again.
My Opinion:
I don't know that I would read this over and over, but it was funny, educational, and the illustrations are way over the top, which adds to the humor. Some of my grandkids had to deal with head lice and they were mortified. I think this book would've helped allay their fears.
Parents panic, we all do it because lice is one of those social stigmas attached to "being a bad parent" or being "unclean". The fact of the matter is, if your kids go to school they're bound to get lice.
If you know of someone who gets lice, or when your own kids come home with nits, go check this book out of the library. It'll help you see that it's not the end of the world.
Bean Dog and Nugget: The Ball
by Charise Mericle Harper


Using simple text and cartoon-style illustrations, Charise Mericle Harper introduces young readers to a new graphic novel series, Bean Dog and Nugget. These two engaging characters capture young kids' actions, reactions, conversations, imagination, and humor with spot-on accuracy. Kids will want to follow Bean Dog and Nugget and their adventures in each and every book in the series.

In The Ball, the first book in this series, Bean Dog and Nugget lose Bean Dog's shiny new ball in a bush. They dream up elaborate and silly ways to get it back while they argue about who is actually going to go and get it. Enter Superdog and Ninja Nugget for a hilarious ending that kids will love and relate to.

My Opinion:
Very quirky and fun. It is written and illustrated like a comic book. The idea is simple and the dialogue is very simple but hilarious. Most 3rd graders could read this by themselves.
The Matchbox Diary
by Paul Fleischman
illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline
Book Blurb:
Newbery Medalist Paul Fleischman and Bagram Ibatoulline tell a breathtaking immigration tale with appeal across generations."Pick whatever you like most. Then I’ll tell you its story."
When a little girl visits her great-grandfather at his curio-filled home, she chooses an unusual object to learn about: an old cigar box. What she finds inside surprises her: a collection of matchboxes making up her great-grandfather’s diary, harboring objects she can hold in her hand, each one evoking a memory. Together they tell of his journey from Italy to a new country, before he could read and write — the olive pit his mother gave him to suck on when there wasn’t enough food; a bottle cap he saw on his way to the boat; a ticket still retaining the thrill of his first baseball game. With a narrative entirely in dialogue, Paul Fleischman makes immediate the two characters’ foray into the past. With warmth and an uncanny eye for detail, Bagram Ibatoulline gives expressive life to their journey through time — and toward each other.

My opinion:
The illustrations are more like pieces of art, you just have to open the canvas. The story is about an Italian immigrant who couldn't read or write, but wanted to keep a diary. He collected match boxes to hold his memories.
Years later his great granddaughter comes to visit and he tells her the story of his life through the bits and pieces he collected. It's very poignant, maybe more for adults. I don't know that many children would enjoy that much history. What a great lesson for everyone to learn their family stories before it's too late.
Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote
by Duncan Tonatiuh


Book blurb:
In this allegorical picture book, a young rabbit named Pancho eagerly awaits his papa’s return. Papa Rabbit traveled north two years ago to find work in the great carrot and lettuce fields to earn money for his family. When Papa does not return, Pancho sets out to find him. He packs Papa’s favorite meal—mole, rice and beans, a heap of warm tortillas, and a jug of aguamiel—and heads north. He meets a coyote, who offers to help Pancho in exchange for some of Papa’s food. They travel together until the food is gone and the coyote decides he is still hungry . . . for Pancho!
Duncan Tonatiuh brings to light the hardship and struggles faced by thousands of families who seek to make better lives for themselves and their children by illegally crossing the border.

My Opinion:
Very symbolic and very one-sided, it does show the lengths a good father will go to, to provide for his family. The illustrations are in keeping with Pancho's heritage. It is both very well written and well illustrated. It is curious to compare these last two books, one about the struggles of a legal immigrant family and the latter, the illegal immigrant family; very similar in their struggles.




Wednesday, March 25, 2015

The Children's Choice Book Awards 2014 Grades K-2

This award isn't like the Caldecott or Newbery awards. Children, parents, and teachers get to vote for their favorites. It's the Children's Choice Book Awards for 2014.

The Stubby Pencil Reviews
 the 2014 winners for grades K-2
We used the Public Library for these reviews but I ended up buying some of them. We were not compensated in any way for these reviews.
Bear and Bee
written and illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier



The illustrations are simple yet amusing. I found myself laughing out loud as I turned the pages. In this book, Bear learns to judge events based on his own experiences and not his assumptions.



Chamelia and the New Kid in Class
by Ethan Long




This book teaches kids how to improve upon jealous feelings. It shows a good alternative to anger and frustration via Chameila's example. The illustrations are fun shapes and collage type art.


Alphabet Trucks
by Samantha R. Vamos, illustrated by Ryan O'Rourke


 



A truck for every letter of the alphabet! And it rhymes. I think little boys and even little girls would love this book. Not only will kids learn the alphabet, but they will learn about different types of trucks.  The illustrations are charming--they remind me a little of the style in Curious George books.

I bought a couple of copies for my grandsons. That's the hazard when you're a book-reviewing grandma.


Mustache Baby
by Bridget Heos, illustrated by Joy Ang




First of all, the illustrations are stinking cute with laugh-out-loudable details. Every page busted me up.

The story is unique and quirky with hilarious consequences and it has a surprise ending that leads to a sequel. This was so much fun that I had to buy this book too.





The Day the Crayons Quit
by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers




The illustrations are crazy cute--like a child's artwork. The story line is imaginative and fresh. I never thought of the crayons' point of view before, but what would happen if your crayons just up and decided they'd had enough? Read it to your kids to find out. Yep--I bought this one too.




Tuesday, March 17, 2015

I Hope They Call Me on a Mission by Benjamin Hyrum White

Book Blurb:
It's never too young to prepare! This charmingly illustrated picture book teaches children what it's like to be a missionary, from riding a bike to studying the gospel to having a companion, and everything they can do now to be ready so that when the time comes, they'll be the best missionaries they can be. Colorful and cute, it s a perfect gift for baptisms and birthdays.

I Hope They Call Me on a Mission by Benjamin Hyrum White, Illustrated by Corey Egbert



Genre: picture book
Pages: 38

My thoughts:

This picture book provides a unique look at missionary life from the perspective of a missionary writing home to his niece and nephew.

On each two-page spread the missionary explains what he does, one topic at a time, then asks, "What can you do now?" It's like an interactive approach to get kids thinking.

The author gives practical, everyday suggestions that will not only help kids be prepared to serve missions, but will improve family life in the process.

The pictures are colorful and whimsical. I think kids will be able to relate to the niece and nephew.

All in all, I think it is very well done. This would be a great book for quiet time during Sacrament meetings, fun for Family Home Evenings, primary classes and Sharing Time.

****

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Mary Ann Reviews The Great Big Treasury of Beatrix Potter

Anyone else out there remember Beatrix Potter? Or am I showing my age?
This great book contains the complete works of Beatrix Potter, 19 of her very own fairy tales with her delightfully intricate illustrations.
I was familiar with Peter Rabbit, but totally unaware of all of the bunnies, mice, kittens, puppies, pigs, ducks, chipmunks, and squirrel characters in jackets and bonnets.
They learn wisdom from natural consequences like--"If you go into Mr. McGregor's garden, Mrs. McGregor may turn you into pie." Or, "If you're not patient and faithfully sit on your eggs, you're liable to lose them to the dogs," like Jemima Puddle Duck. Don't you totally love that name?
I envy authors who can illustrate their own stories. Beatrix and her brother Bertram, grew up lonely in a very wealthy family. They snuck woodland creatures into the house to study and draw them.
Beatrix Potter was born in London, 1866, and later raised on an estate in Scotland. A lot of her stories were written as gifts to family and friends.
Return to the woodland and share these classic stories from a simpler era, with your kids and grandkids.

Saturday, February 22, 2014

A is for Abinadi by Heidi Peolman Illustrated by Jason Pruett Review by Mary Ann

A is for Abinadi
by Heidi Poelman
illustrated by Jason Pruett

board book for preschoolers through early grades
Publisher: Cedar Fort
Content: An alphabet book of Scripture heroes
Pages: 32

What I liked about this book:
Each page has a giant letter and a simple paragraph that explains that character--a good mix of characters from all of the standard works.

The illustrations are colorful with a wee twist. On my second read-through (ok, not the most observant), I noticed what I thought were quirky, random items added to the scenes, but duh, they all start with the same letter of that page. Some are hidden--fun and imaginative.

I think this book will hold children's attention for several readings. I give it ***

You can buy it at any LDS bookstore or here:
http://www.amazon.com/Abinadi-Alphabet-Book-Scripture-Heroes-ebook/dp/B00ICUQH8E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1392362592&sr=8-1&keywords=a+is+for+abinadi