Monday, July 17, 2017

7 FUN Summertime Journaling Activities Part 3 Travel/Adventure Journals with FREE printables

Part 3 Travel/Adventure Journals

The best part about travel or adventure journals is that you don't have to go anywhere to use them. You can use your imagination to determine the destination and sites you'll see along the way.
Print out a road map or use Google maps to plot your course. Look up interesting fun facts about your destination
while you're Googling.
Of course, the main reason we make travel journals for kids is to ease their restlessness on long road trips.
It's like a quiet book that you can color or journal in.
There are tons of FREE printables on Pinterest that you can download and print off for your travel journals.


I'm going to show you the journals I made for my grandkids this summer. Some of them are trying out their notebooks at this very moment. These pages are in the FREE Library of Printables and when you  subscribe to my email list. 

I downloaded pre-school papers from
3 Dinosaurs  for the younger kids who aren't reading yet. They are from Goldilocks and the Three Bears section. This website has tons of fun printables.




This is a summary-of-the-day kind of page.

Journal  pages for older kids.

Photo or drawing pages for younger kids.

Mazes

Travel Games

Ciphers and word searches

I laminated some of the pages and gave the kids dry erase markers so they could use the pages over and over.

Then I used my Cinch to punch
the holes and add the spiral binding.
You could add your pages to a three-ring binder.

It was a lot of work, but a huge learning experience. Of course, I learned most of my lessons after my grandkids' journals were already printed, things I would've liked to have done differently.
Oh well, that's the best way to learn.
I'm sure I will find even more things
to improve upon next time.



Keep on journaling!

Always,

Monday, July 10, 2017

7 Fun Summertime Journaling Activies for Kids Part 2


Here it is: Part 2!

#3 The Cipher/I Spy Journal
Kids can collect secret codes in their journals. You can write a secret message in their journals and they can write messages in each other's journals. I haven't met a kid yet (young or old) who doesn't enjoy a good, old-fashioned secret decoder. 

Google ciphers and you have a plethora to choose from. Here is a link to the cipher wheel I used:


This gives you 26 different substitution alphabet possibilities.

Practice one code all week long. Add another code every week. Cub Scouts have a section  about Indian glyphs. That would make a super fun secret code.



National Treasure made the Ottendorf cipher famous:

  • Each correspondent has a copy of the same book title and edition to use as the key.
  • This cipher consists of three numbers  X  -  X  -  X
  • The first number is the page number, the second number is the line on that page, and the third number is the letter in that line.

There are some fun books to read for summer hidden clue fun:




For twelve-year-old Emily, the best thing about moving to San Francisco is that it's the home city of her literary idol: Garrison Griswold, book publisher and creator of the online sensation Book Scavenger (a game where books are hidden in cities all over the country and clues to find them are revealed through puzzles). Upon her arrival, however, Emily learns that Griswold has been attacked and is now in a coma, and no one knows anything about the epic new game he had been poised to launch. Then Emily and her new friend James discover an odd book, which they come to believe is from Griswold himself, and might contain the only copy of his mysterious new game.
Racing against time, Emily and James rush from clue to clue, desperate to figure out the secret at the heart of Griswold's new game―before those who attacked Griswold come after them too.

This was so much fun to read that I did a scavenger hunt for two of my kids' families. The author has a fun website where there are clues to books hidden by fans all over the country. The author, herself hides books whenever she goes on tour. It's kind of like geo-caching for books.

Here is the sequel:


Mr. Quisling is definitely up to something mysterious, and Emily and James are on high alert. First, there's the coded note he drops at a book event. Then, they uncover a trail of encrypted messages in Mark Twain-penned books hidden through Book Scavenger. What's most suspicious is that each hidden book triggers an arson fire.
As the sleuthing friends dig deeper, they discover Mr. Quisling has been hunting a legendary historical puzzle: the Unbreakable Code. This new mystery is irresistible, but Emily and James can't ignore the signs that Mr. Quisling might be the arsonist.
The clock is ticking as the arson fires multiply, and Emily and James race to crack the code of a lifetime.

Another fun cipher for kids is the PIG PEN cipher:




Another fun book to read with your kids this summer is:




This was one of my most favorite books growing up. I loved to spy around the neighborhood and write everything down in my notebook. Harriet's journal gets her into trouble, so a word to the wise..."keep it secret, keep it safe."

No matter what...

Keep on Journaling!


Monday, July 3, 2017

From My Journal: Happy Independence Day!

 When it is the season for celebrating our Independence I like to reflect on a couple of things:

First, I am so grateful that I have not yet had to experience war on my front doorstep as others have. 

Can you imagine being trapped aboard an enemy vessel with only a small portal to watch the perilous fight at Fort McHenry?



The very flag that flew over Fort McHenry that inspired Francis Scott Key.
Waiting in what must've been the longest, darkest night and struggling to see the outcome--would the patriots be able to hang on? The lyrics give you a glimpse into his feelings as he waited for the approaching dawn... "Oh say, can you see..."

Some of the words got cut off in the original picture, but I am so pleased to have a picture of this at all.

Second, I like to ponder on the sacrifices made by our fore-fathers. Would I have been willing to risk the lives of my family, and go without conveniences and food?

The signers of the Declaration of Independence, 56 wealthy and well-educated men sacrificed everything they had.

The Americans Who Risked Everything by Rush Limbaugh is worth the read, or you can listen to a condensed version by Paul Harvey here on YouTube.

Have a safe, and fun celebration, but take time to remember those to whom we owe our freedoms and our prosperous lifestyles.

From my journal,